Posts Tagged ‘history’

The Inn at Vineyards Crossing

Thursday, April 17th, 2014

The Bed and Breakfast Association of Virginia welcomes the Inn at Vineyards Crossing to its list of inspected and approved members! Built in 1787 as Barbee’s Tavern, the B&B originally served as a haven for Confederate and Union soldiers during the Civil War. This Tavern Building remains a unique element of the Inn at Vineyards Crossing as it features original chestnut logs and stone mortar along with three original fireplaces.

The Inn at Vineyards Crossing was open in order to “provide a superior B&B which entails tight partnerships with local wineries, hunt clubs, and other local attractions.” These partnerships allow the Inn at Vineyards Crossing to serve guests with not only an upscale stay experience but with amenity options that turn the area from a ‘place to stay’ into a ‘destination.’

A BBAV membership allows Vineyards Crossing’s innkeepers to “comply with a set of basic standards, which are all minimum basics in the hospitality industry,” thereby “giving the consumer confidence in booking a stay.” In other words, membership with BBAV allows Vineyards Crossing to provide guests with the best experience possible, helping Innkeeper, Josh Haugh to provide a superior stay experience.

“Having the ability to interact directly with our guests, building relationships with our guests and creating memories for them, giving them a reason to return.” And so, the Inn at Vineyards Crossing provides the ideal destination for those looking for an interactive, welcoming, and memorable experience away from home.

Welcome to BBAV, The Inn at Vineyard Crossing!

Welcome, The Inn at Vineyard Crossing!

Black History Month in Virginia

Friday, February 21st, 2014

As you’re probably already aware, this month is Black History Month, and Virginia has been presenting its history in a variety of displays, exhibitions, and festivities. Though February will be over soon, many of these displays last until the end of the month, so if you’re interested in delving into the African-American history of the Commonwealth, book yourself a room at a bed & breakfast, and take in an exhibit or two.

Enjoy a unique Black History Tour from your very own Segway. This two hour, 8-mile tour with take you through the history of Richmond’s African-American population and “the rise of the ‘Birthplace of Black Capitalism in America’” (RiverCitySegs). (Richmond B&Bs: Scents of Cedar B&B, Maury Place at Monument, and Museum District B&B.)

Jamestown, Yorktown, and Williamsburg are three of the most well-known historic sites in Virginia, and now they will take you back in time with a gallery exhibit for Black History Month:  From Africa to Virginia. “The parent culture of Africans brought to Virginia in 1619 is portrayed in a diorama that includes a full-scale dwelling and artifacts from the Ambundu culture of Angola” (HistoryisFun). From outdoor interpretive programs to guided gallery tours, you’ll find yourself wonderfully immersed in Commonwealth history. (Williamsburg B&Bs: Magnolia Manor, Marl Inn B&B, and Jasmine Plantation.)

Lastly, we have Thomas Day. “Long before the Civil War–long before slaves were free—an African-American quietly emerged as a titan of the Southern furniture manufacturing industry. When trailblazers are honored during Black History month in February, this entrepreneur is often overlooked” (ThomasDayHouse.org). Thomas Day was a businessman who became known for his unique furniture, and his crafts are now displayed at various locations such as our very own Inn Virginia member, Oak Grove Plantation B&B. Don’t miss the Thomas Day Tour, of which Oak Grove Plantation is a sponsor.

Thomas Day's designs at Oak Grove Plantation

Thomas Day’s designs at Oak Grove Plantation

Daughter of the Stars Bed and Breakfast Passes BBAV Inspection

Friday, November 22nd, 2013
Daughter of the Stars Bed and Breakfast Passes BBAV Inspection

Daughter of the Stars Bed and Breakfast Passes BBAV Inspection

The newest B&B to pass the Bed and Breakfast Association of Virginia’s inspection into membership is the Daughter of the Stars B&B in Stanley, Virginia. Patrick Burns the owner, decided to have a BBAV inspection in order to help them connect with BBAV’s experienced knowledge base, and thus provide a better experience for their guests, as well as to set their B&B against an outside standard of inspection that ensures guests of the B&B’s high quality.

 

Daughter of the Stars began as an endeavor to “to do something interesting, unique, enjoyable and memorable” while “creating a unique, interesting, educational, fun, and successful travel experience” for guests. Indeed, this B&B does all of the above with its specialization in “The lesser known stories of the Shenandoah Valley”, which allows guests to celebrate and explore the history of foods, cultures, and customs native to the valley. Innkeeper, Misty Henderson, will delight guests with her cooking, and hospitality.

 

Civil War currency

Civil War currency

“In our Authentic Art and Artifacts Gift Shop,” Patrick described, “we have items like real Civil War currency and authentic Native American art and artifacts for sale. This way our guests not only hear the History, but they can touch it and own a piece of it. All of the Native American artifacts are from tribes that are known to have been in the Shenandoah Valley.”

 

Every guest room contains a private baths with Whirlpool tubs, queen-sized beds, and fireplaces that combine to create a romantic and comfortable atmosphere. Thus, guests looking for a vacation with a significant other or friend, or some alone time, the Daughter of the Stars B&B is perfect for a uniquely cultural and relaxing experience in the heart of the Shenandoah Valley.

Celebrate Warner Heritage at Ancestral Homecoming Weekend

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

The Inn at Warner Hall is a confluence of historical figures, namely George Washington, Robert E. Lee and Meriwether Lewis, all of whom are direct descents of Augustine Warner, founder of the inn. (Even the Queen of England herself, Elizabeth II, is a Warner relative. According to innkeepers Troy and Theresa Stavens, “In England, Warner Hall is referred to as ‘the home of the Queen’s American ancestors.’”)

With family members like these, who wouldn’t want to celebrate such heritage? The Inn at Warner Hall is doing just that from July 26-28, 2013 at their Ancestral Homecoming Weekend. The celebratory reunion begins on the evening of July 26 with a buffet dinner where long lost family members can either reconnect or meet for the first time. Following dinner, two archaeologists from the Fairfield Foundation, David Brown and Thane Harpole, will be making a presentation about Warner Hall in the 18th Century. (These two archaeologists also happen to be the author of a book entitled “Warner Hall: Story of a Great Plantation.)

Saturday’s activities will include a private tour of Colonial Williamsburg, a tour of White Marsh Plantation, and an 18th century dinner, and presentations by Richard Weaver.

Sunday will include a private service at Jamestown Memorial Church and a trip to Poquoson for a guided tour of “the site of Augustine Warner I’s first land grant” (Inn at Warner Hall).

If you are a Warner descendent who would like to indulge in your familial history, then give the Inn at Warner Hall a call at 800.331.2720 or send them an email at info@warnerhall.com.

Pictures-001

 

By Tara Stoll

Healthcare Career Leads to a Fresh Start in Hospitality

Thursday, July 18th, 2013

New owners of Prospect Hill Plantation Inn are excited for their new adventure

 

Prospect Hill Plantation Inn

The Historic Manor sites on 40-acres of land

Prospect Hill Plantation is the newest establishment to pass the Bed and Breakfast Association of Virginia’s property inspection (BBAV). Prospect Hill, set outside historic Charlottesville, VA was originally an 18th century plantation. It is now owned by Dr. Bobby and Paula Findley, who bought the Plantation in the search for a new and exciting lifestyle to follow Dr. Findley’s 25 year long career in chiropractic healthcare. The property itself includes 40-acres of land as well as the historic Manor House, which boasts eleven guest rooms and cottages complete with modern amenities. Prospect Hill prides itself on its vast history, as another one of the guest rooms is the “original cabin, built in 1699, is still used for housing overnight guests… some 314 years later” according to owner Dr. Frindley.

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Dr. Bobby & Paula Findley, owners of Prospect Hill Plantation Inn

When asked why membership with the BBAV was important, Dr. Findley stated “All inns are unique in their own way and offer a compelling experience to their guest… what separates one inn from another, though, is the level of quality… both in the experience and in terms of cleanliness. Being inspected simply helps us stress that we value our guests’ experience over everything else.”

Aside from offering unique guest rooms and a lavish setting by the Blue Ridge Mountains, Prospect Hill Plantation also offers a wonderful culinary experience in the form of a 4 course prix-fixe dinner for it’s guests and members of the Charlottesville community.

    Dr. Findley explains that his favorite aspect of being a bed and breakfast owner is the opportunity to meet the interesting guests that are constantly staying at Prospect Hill. For the future, Dr. Findley notes that he hopes to “restore Prospect Hill to its former glory as one of the premier dining and lodging destinations in central Virginia!”

    BBAV President Heidi Lanford is extremely happy about Prospect Hill’s addition to the Association. When asked about her thoughts regarding Prospect Hill, Lanford explained “it is so wonderful to have such a historic, and beautiful property pass our property inspection. Prospect Hill is another great example of the impressive establishments that are associated with BBAV.”

Brierley Hill, Lexington, VA

Saturday, March 30th, 2013

In their newly released article “The 20 Best Small Towns to Visit in 2013,” Smithsonian Magazine named Lexington, Virginia as number 16 out of the 20 small towns. Lexington is well-known for hosting a variety of attractions—Washington and Lee University, Virginia Military Institute, Boxerwood Gardens, the Virginia Horse Center, and a great deal of Civil War history. All vacations and getaways need lodging, of course, and Lexington boasts of number of fantastic inns, one of which is Brierley Hill.

Brierley Hill recently welcomed two new innkeepers, Dave and Karen Innocent, who took ownership on February 28, 2013. In spite of a snowstorm and power outages, the Innocents welcomed their first guests on March 9, solidifying their adventure as innkeepers.

Dave and Karen have always had a heart for hospitality. Their Pennsylvania home was often the meeting place for their three sons’ friends, family get-togethers, church gatherings, and general socializing. Dave states, “It was not unusual to wake up to see fifteen or so people spread out sleeping in our house. We loved it!”

With Dave’s dissatisfaction with his career in automobile sales and Karen’s heart for hospitality, the Innocents decided to pursue a life of innkeeping. Their middle son’s education at Liberty University first brought them to Lexington. “We drove into Lexington, and I was immediately drawn to the town,” Dave reflects. “It was a warm day, and people were walking around outside. When we returned home, I did a Google search for B&Bs near Lexington, and I saw Brierley Hill listed. I called the realtor, who was surprised that I had seen Brierley online since they had literally just posted the ‘for sale’ ad. I guess you could say it was fate!”

Dave, Karen, and their two dogs—a golden retriever and a Bernese mountain dog—look forward to welcoming future guests and helping them explore the beautiful Lexington area.

By Tara Stoll

Madison, Montpelier, and a 262nd Birthday

Thursday, March 7th, 2013

March 16, 2013 will be the 262nd birthday of James Madison, our very own fourth President of the United States and Father of the Constitution, who just also happened to be a Virginia native. Madison made his home at Montpelier in Orange County, VA, and in honor of his birthday, there will be a celebration and ceremony at the estate:  “Visit with Mr. and Mrs. Madison in their home throughout the day, and attend a poignant wreath presentation ceremony in the Madison Family Cemetery at 1:30 p.m.” (Montpelier.org).

And now, in honor of James Madison, we present to you a few “fun facts” about this former president:

-          Madison was only 5’4, and he never weighed more than 100 pounds. (James Madison)

-          Madison was the first president to hold an Inaugural Ball. (James Madison)

-          Madison was once arrested with Thomas Jefferson for violating the laws of Vermont and taking a carriage ride on a Sunday. (The Health of the President)

-          Madison was 1 of 12 children. (Facts)

-          James and his wife Dolley never had children of their own, but James helped raise Dolley’s son from her previous marriage. (Facts)

-          Madison was the first president to wear trousers instead of knee breeches. (Facts)

-          Madison’s inaugural jacket was made of wool from the sheep that resided at Montpelier. (Facts)

If you’re searching for accommodations in Orange, VA, then look no further, as we have a number of InnVirginia B&Bs only a short drive away from Montpelier:

Chestnut Hill Bed & Breakfast
Holladay House
Inn on Poplar Hill
Inn at Westwood Farm
Mayhurst Inn
The Inn at Willow Grove

By Tara Stoll

Giving of Thanks in 2012

Monday, October 15th, 2012

Turkey, and mashed potatoes, and cranberry sauce, oh my! Thanksgiving is approaching with great rapidity, and if you are looking for something a bit different than the usual holiday get-together, consider some of the following events:

“On December 4, 1619, a group of 38 settlers, led by Captain John Woodlief, arrived at Berkeley Plantation in Virginia, from Bristol, England. On the banks of the James River the Englishmen proclaimed ‘We ordaine that the day of our ship’s arrival at the place assigned for plantacon, in the land of Virginia, shall be yearly and perpetually keept holy as a day of Thanksgiving to Almighty God’(Virginia Thanksgiving Festival.) In keeping with the tradition of this first official Thanksgiving, you too can celebrate at the very same site where these travelers first held their own feast—Berkeley Plantation. On November 4, 2012, delight in a day of food and drink, games, historic costumes, tribal dancers, and parades at the Virginia Thanksgiving Festival.

But that, my dear reader, is not the only celebration of so-called “Turkey Day” in which you can partake. On November 22, 2012, enjoy a Decadent Thanksgiving Feast at BBAV member Cooper’s Landing Inn, or indulge in the 7th Annual Thanksgiving Feast at Holladay House.

And now, I leave you with a Thanksgiving blessing:

“May your stuffing be tasty,
May your turkey plump,
May your potatoes and gravy
Have nary a lump.
May your yams be delicious
And your pies take the prize,
And may your Thanksgiving dinner
Stay off your thighs!”
–Anonymous

By Tara Stoll

Staunton Ghost Tours

Thursday, October 4th, 2012

 “Ghost hunting has grown in the past two decades from a little-known hobby to a much more popular pursuit. Ghost hunters say that, judging from the number of ghost-hunting organizations with Web sites, there are hundreds of groups with thousands of members in the United States.” –SF Gate

Halloween will be here shortly, and perhaps you are looking for something different than the usual parties, cheesy costumes, and pseudo-creepy decorations. Perhaps, then, you should brave the cold fingers of the otherworld and participate in a ghost tour of Staunton, VA.  (Cue thunder sound effect.)

During the month of October, there is a ghost tour of historic Staunton, Virginia every Friday and Saturday evening, beginning promptly at 7pm. Ghost Box tours are also available every Friday and Saturday evening, beginning at 9pm. (“A ghost box is a communication tool used by some investigators to speak to the other side. Typically, a ghost box is a modified portable AM/FM radio that continuously scans the band. When on, it is believed to create white noise and audio remnants from broadcast stations that entities are able to manipulate to create words and even entire sentences.”) On Halloween evening, there will only be one tour at 7pm.

So, what happens on these so-called “ghost tours?”  I’m delighted you asked. If you’re expecting to be scared, or you’re anticipating a ghostly sighting, you will probably be disappointed. (Having said that, though, ghost box tours can be pretty creepy.) These tours “blend science, history, paranormal and legend together.”  They explain the stories behind all of the ghost sightings around Staunton, such as the ghost of Charlotte, who hurled tools at the construction workers that were remodeling her old house.  However, the tours are not limited to the paranormal. They also give explanations of the exquisite architecture around the Queen City.

Some quick notes:

-The tour is not recommended for small children.

-It is a 90-minute to 2-hour tour, so be prepared to walk a lot.

-There are very few public restrooms along the tour.

-Need lodging? How about a BBAV member inn.

 

By Tara Stoll

Jamestown Settlement, Williamsburg, VA

Thursday, July 26th, 2012

If you’ve ever seen a viewing of Disney’s Pocahontas or the 2005 film The New World, then you already have a visual of  Jamestown, Virginia in the 17th Century. But neither movie nor history book can replace an in-person visit to the town that was the first permanent English settlement in the Americas: “In 1607, 13 years before the Pilgrims landed in Massachusetts, a group of 104 English men and boys began a settlement on the banks of Virginia’s James River. They were sponsored by the Virginia Company of London, whose stockholders hoped to make a profit from the resources of the New World.”

Williamsburg, Va’s Jamestown Settlement allows for the opportunity to experience the original colony portrayed through gallery exhibits, introductory films, replica ships, and re-creations of a colonial fort and a Powhatan village.

Make the most of your visit to Jamestown Settlement with daily demonstrations and optional guided tours.Throughout the day, visitors can see demonstrations of matchlock musket-firing, leatherworking, woodworking and blacksmithing in the fort, cooking and tool-making in the Powhatan Indian village, and cargo handling at the ships’ pier. Optional guided tours of the outdoor areas are offered at 10 and 11 a.m. and 12, 1, 2 and 3 p.m. Artillery demonstrations are held daily at 11 a.m. on the ships’ pier, 2:45 p.m. in the riverfront discovery area, and at 4:15 p.m. in the re-created fort.” – History is Fun

(NOTE: Thank you to the individual who pointed out that Jamestown Settlement is an educational opportunity and is not to be confused with the site of the original colony. For more information about the original site, Historic Jamestowne, click here.)

©Terreta

BBAV Lodging:

A Boxwood Inn of Williamsburg

A Williamsburg White House

Bentley Manor Inn

Colonial Capital B&B

Magnolia Manor

Newport House B&B

Liberty Rose B&B

Marl Inn B&B

York River Inn B&B

 

By Tara Stoll