Posts Tagged ‘lighthouse’

Stay Cool at a Virginia Waterfront B&B

Friday, July 12th, 2013

There’s no doubt that summer in Virginia is hot and humid, which is why so many individuals gravitate towards water activities to escape the oppressive heat. Numerous InnVirginia members happen to be waterfront B&Bs, so not only can you enjoy a refreshing relaxation along the water, but you can begin and end your day in the cool luxury of your desired inn.

The Essex Inn Bed & Breakfast is located in Tappahannock, VA, close by to well-known Tidewater rivers and with numerous coinciding creeks. According to owners Bob and Janice, “The Potomac, the Rappahannock, the James, and the York rivers of the Tidewater are the watery roads of history.”  Perch on the edge of a river pier with your fishing pole, or take your canoe or kayak down the water for a day of shoreline site-seeing.

North River is a Gloucester, VA inn with watery relaxation right in its name. Owners Breck and Mary Montague state, “The North River and her creeks provide the perfect setting for walks as well as exploring in our canoe and kayaks. From an abundance of wildlife to the ever-changing river, your jaunts will become journeys of discovery.” Three sides of the North River Inn are surrounded by water, so if you find yourself tired after a day of exploration, rest on the riverbanks, and watch the cool waters flow by.

Baywatch Inn of Franklin City is in a wonderfully quiet Virginia village. The town offers water-based activities like fishing, crabbing, clamming, kayaking, or, if you’d prefer, you can simply sit on the front porch of the inn and observe the restful beauty of the Chesapeake Bay. Innkeepers Carl and Terri Smith say, “NASA Wallops Island can be seen across the bay from Bay Watch especially at night, along with the Chincoteague Island skyline and the Assateague Island lighthouse!”

See all our B&Bs that are on the water and stay cool this summer!

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By Tara Stoll

Virginia Lighthouses, Summer 2011

Monday, July 18th, 2011

“Lighthouses don’t go running all over an island looking for boats to save; they just stand there shining.”
- Anne Lamott

Lighthouses have been a source of fascination for people for many years, and we here in Virginia are lucky to have some of these beautiful structures decorate our coasts. They stand with silent strength, with few frills or ornamentation, and yet the light that shines from them cannot go unnoticed. For many years, these lighthouses kept ships from crashing to shore, ensuring safety to the crew aboard the vessels. Now these structures are sources of history and, as always, symbolic representations of hope and guidance. And, of course, they are a wonderful destination for those on a Virginia vacation.

The lighthouses of Virginia include the Old Cape Henry Lighthouse, built in 1792, the Assateague Lighthouse, built in 1833, the Old Point Comfort Lighthouse, built in 1802, and the New Point Comfort Lighthouse, commissioned by Thomas Jefferson in 1804. As you can imagine, each of these lighthouses possesses a deep history, having survived battles and skirmishes and years of being weathered by ocean waves.

If you’re planning to visit one of these lighthouses, be sure to check out their schedules. Some allow tours during most of the years, but others have set times that the outside public is allowed to see the inside. (Also, toughen up those leg muscles if you plan to climb up the inside of the lighthouse. Those stairs give you a good workout!) Be sure to check out our list of bed and breakfasts to find the perfect inn for you to relax at during your trip to visit the lighthouses.

© 2011 http://www.virginia.org/lighthouses/

© 2011 http://www.virginia.org/lighthouses/

© 2011 http://www.virginia.org/lighthouses/

 Facts courtesy of Virginia Tourism Corporation, © 2011.

By Tara Stoll